This list of the greatest Florida movies includes more than its share of Oscar winners and box-office smashes ... along with a few movies you may not be so familiar with.

What, exactly, qualifies as a "Florida" movie? Other than lots of sweating?


It’s simple. The movie – or at least a good portion of the movie – needs to be set in Florida. That’s it. In this case, common sense tells you Florida is either the main setting of the film or shares top billing with another place.


That rules out classics such as "Goodfellas," "Godfather Part II," "Apollo 13," "Out of Sight" and "Spotlight" – all movies with a few key scenes set in Florida, but it’s impossible to argue New York, outer space, Detroit and Boston aren’t the places most identified with those films.


Also, movies that were filmed in Florida but set in another location, such as "The Truman Show," which was filmed at Seaside but set in California, aren’t in the mix.


Check out our deep-dive list of the Top 20 Florida Movies of All Time:


20. "Jeepers Creepers" (2001)


Release Date: Aug. 31, 2001


Box Office (Budget): $59.2 million ($10 million)


Director: Victor Salva


Starring: Justin Long, Gina Phillips, Jonathan Breck, Patricia Belcher, Eileen Brennan


Where We Be?: Ocala, Reddick, Dunnellon


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Horror movie about twins battling an ancient, evil creature that feasts on humans every 23rd spring in order to survive.


Scene to Remember: The final scene, with Long screaming in The Creeper’s cave as it removes his eyeballs.


Best Line: "Every 23rd spring, for 23 days … it gets to eat."


Legacy: "Jeepers" was a surprise hit in one of the worst movie summers in history. It’s also notable because it spawned a pair of sequels and was one of our first introductions to Long, who would carve out a lengthy career in comedic roles.


MVP: Jonathan Breck. Horror movies are nothing without a villain, and he’s a great one.


Rotten Tomatoes: 46% Fresh


Streaming On: Nope


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19. "Just Cause" (1995)


Release Date: Feb. 17, 1995


Box Office (Budget): $36.8 million ($27 million)


Director: Arne Glimcher


Starring: Sean Connery, Laurence Fishburne, Kate Capshaw, Ed Harris, Blair Underwood, Ruby Dee, Scarlett Johansson


Where We Be?: Somewhere in the Everglades


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Oscar nominees all over the place in a Deep South-set murder mystery.


Scene to Remember: When Connery pulls the murder weapon out of the swamp and shows it to Fishburne.


Best Line: "They were fine and healthy. And they said they forgive you."


Legacy: This movie was dismissed as a by-the-book legal thriller when it was released, but deserves a re-watch. Connery hams it up but Fishburne and Harris are electric in their roles. And watch out for a young Johansson in one of her first on-screen appearances.


MVP: Laurence Fishburne. His constantly sweaty, revenge-driven sheriff steals the show and probably deserved his own movie.


Rotten Tomatoes: 24% Fresh


Streaming On: Nope


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18. "Never Back Down" (2008)


Release Date: March 14, 2008


Box Office (Budget): $41.6 million ($20 million)


Director: Jeff Wadlow


Starring: Sean Faris, Amber Heard, Cam Gigandet, Evan Peters, Leslie Hope, Djimon Hounsou


Where We Be?: Orlando


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Teenage action movie focused on mixed martial arts that rips off The Karate Kid.


Scene to Remember: When Faris catches a surprise beatdown from Gigandet at the party.


Best Line: "The only time you’re happy is when you’re hurting people."


Legacy: This movie was a toss-away action flick that made double its budget and spawned two sequels. What’s more impressive is the casting of Heard and Peters before they became stars and reeling in an Oscar nominee in Hounsou in the Mr. Miyagi/mentor role. Faris, as the movie’s star, is the only real drawback. Because he can’t act.


MVP: Cam Gigandet. His role as the villain is what keeps the movie chugging along.


Rotten Tomatoes: 23% Fresh


Streaming On: Hulu


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17. "Cocoon" (1985)


Release Date: June 21, 1985


Box Office (Budget): $85.3 million ($17.5 million)


Director: Ron Howard


Starring: Don Ameche, Wilford Brimley, Hume Cronyn, Jessica Tandy, Brian Dennehy, Steve Guttenberg, Tahnee Welch


Where We Be?: St. Petersburg


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Aliens trying to return home bond with senior citizens at a retirement home and conscript them to help return to their home planet.


Scene to Remember: When Ameche, Brimley and Cronyn’s characters break into the pool and find the cocoons for the first time.


Best Line: "Ain’t a son of a bitch in the world has to know we’re in that pool."


Legacy: Cocoon was a box-office smash and won Academy Awards for Best Visual Effects and Best Supporting Actor for Ameche, who won in his only nomination over a career that spanned seven decades.


MVP: Wilford Brimley. Ameche may have won the Oscar, but Brimley is the real star ... just like everything he was ever in, pretty much.


Rotten Tomatoes: 77% Fresh


Streaming On: Nope


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16. "Monster" (2003)


Release Date: Dec. 24, 2003


Box Office (Budget): $60.4 million ($8 million)


Director: Patty Jenkins


Starring: Charlize Theron, Christina Ricci


Where We Be?: Daytona Beach


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Riveting tale of possibly the most infamous female serial killer in history.


Scene to Remember: When Theron and Ricci’s characters first meet.


Best Line: "I’m not a bad person. I’m a real good person."


Legacy: Theron won the Academy Award (and every other award that year) for Best Actress for her portrayal of serial killer Aileen Wuornos. Famed film critic Roger Ebert called her performance "one of the greatest in the history of cinema." Somehow, Jenkins wouldn’t direct another feature for 14 years when she helmed "Wonder Woman."


MVP: Charlize Theron. Who else?


Rotten Tomatoes: 81% Fresh


Streaming On: Vudu, Tubi


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15. "Any Given Sunday" (1999)


Release Date: Dec. 22, 1999


Box Office (Budget): $100.2 million ($55 million)


Director: Oliver Stone


Starring: Al Pacino, Jamie Foxx, Cameron Diaz, James Woods, LL Cool J, Lawrence Taylor, Jim Brown, Matthew Modine


Where We Be?: Miami


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Oliver Stone’s love letter to professional football.


Scene to Remember: Pacino’s locker-room speech before his final game with the Sharks is one of the all-time great sports movie moments.


Best Line: "The inches we need are everywhere around us."


Legacy: Stone’s unflinching look at the realities of professional football is even more poignant today than when it was released and the on-set conflicts between Foxx and LL Cool J have taken on urban legend status. Stone originally wanted to cast Sean "Puffy" Combs in Foxx’s role as Willie Beamen.


MVP: Jamie Foxx. Known to that point strictly as a comedian, this was the role that showed Foxx also had dramatic chops.


Rotten Tomatoes: 52% Fresh


Streaming On: Vudu, Cinemax Go


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14. "Key Largo" (1948)


Release Date: July 16, 1948


Box Office (Budget): $4.3 million ($1.7 million)


Director: John Huston


Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Edward G. Robinson, Lauren Bacall, Lionel Barrymore, Claire Trevor


Where We Be?: Key Largo


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Action-thriller set in the Florida Keys starring two of the most iconic movie stars of all-time and directed by John Freaking Huston.


Scene to Remember: When Robinson forces Trevor to sing a song for him and his gangster friends in order to get a drink. Heartbreaking stuff.


Best Line: "You deserve this."


Legacy: Claire Trevor won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role as Gaye, the alcoholic former girlfriend of the story’s villain, Rocco. Huston, arguably the greatest director of all-time, put "Key Largo" out the same year he won his only Academy Award for Best Director for another movie starring Bogart, "The Treasure of Sierra Madre."


MVP: Humphrey Bogart. After four movies with Robinson, Bogey gets top billing for the first time and delivers.


Rotten Tomatoes: 97% Fresh


Streaming On: Nope


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13. "Bad Boys" (1995)


Release Date: April 7, 1995


Box Office (Budget): $141.4 million ($19 million)


Director: Michael Bay


Starring: Will Smith, Martin Lawrence, Tea Leoni, Joe Pantoliano, Tcheky Karyo, Theresa Randle


Where We Be?: Miami


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: The hottest comic in the world, next big action star and next big action director revamp the buddy cop genre.


Scene to Remember: The final battle at the airport and ensuing car chase.


Best Line: "Baaaaaaad boys …. Baaaaaaaad boys."


Legacy: Smith hit mega-star status the next summer with "Independence Day." Lawrence kicked off a run of box-office success that would last a decade. Bay hit a home run in his directorial debut as his first three movies – "Bad Boys," "The Rock" (1996) and "Armageddon" (1998) – made $1.03 billion at the box office.


MVP: Michael Bay. Smith and Lawrence share top billing, but Bay’s visual style created an entire genre.


Rotten Tomatoes: 42% Fresh


Streaming On: Netflix


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12. "Wild Things" (1998)


Release Date: March 20, 1998


Box Office (Budget): $56 million ($20 million)


Director: John McNaughton


Starring: Neve Campbell, Kevin Bacon, Matt Dillon, Denise Richards, Bill Murray


Where We Be?: Miami


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Erotic thriller with plot twists that will have audiences guessing until the final scene.


Scene to Remember: The post-credits sequence that fills in all the gaps.


Best Line: "People aren’t always what they appear to be."


Legacy: This movie is remembered for a lot of reasons that haven’t aged well, but it’s also a great thriller with a jigsaw-puzzle plot that makes for a good re-watch. Campbell’s star was never bigger here following two other box-office hits in "Scream" (1996), "Scream 2" (1997) and coinciding with her hit TV show, "Party of Five."


MVP: Bill Murray. It’s not as much fun without him playing the sleazy attorney.


Rotten Tomatoes: 63% Fresh


Streaming On: Crackle


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11. "The Flight of the Navigator" (1986)


Release Date: Aug. 1, 1986


Box Office (Budget): $18.5 million ($9 million)


Director: Randal Kleiser


Starring: Joey Cramer, Paul Reubens (voice), Cliff DeYoung, Veronica Cartwright, Matt Adler, Sarah Jessica Parker, Howard Hesseman


Where We Be?: Fort Lauderdale


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Kid-friendly sci-fi movie with ground-breaking special effects that incorporates time travel in a smart way.


Scene to Remember: When Cramer emerges from the ravine only to realize eight years have passed.


Best Line: "Correction. I need the superior information in your inferior brain to fly this thing."


Legacy: Despite largely positive reviews and a loyal cult following, this movie has been essentially lost to history. It’s not hard to find a reason why – it was released just two weeks after the James Cameron-directed blockbuster "Aliens," and any movie of a similar genre that opened in its wake was going to be hurt, even if it was meant for kids.


MVP: Paul Reubens. It’s Reubens’ voiceover skills that take the movie to another level as Max, the robotic commander of the spaceship.


Rotten Tomatoes: 83% Fresh


Streaming On: Disney+ (Nov. 12)


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10. "The Florida Project" (2017)


Release Date: Oct. 6, 2017


Box Office (Budget): $11.3 million ($2 million)


Director: Sean Baker


Starring: Willem Dafoe, Brooklynn Prince, Bria Vinaite, Valeria Cotto, Christopher Rivera, Caleb Landry Jones


Where We Be?: Kissimmee


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Gut-wrenching drama about a mother and daughter scraping by living in a rundown hotel miles from Disney World.


Scene to Remember: The dream/imagination sequence that ends the film and was shot by Baker at Disney World in secret, using an iPhone 6S Plus.


Best Line: "I can always tell when adults are about to cry."


Legacy: Dafoe was nominated for a Golden Globe and an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor after his role as the hotel manager with a heart of gold. This isn’t a movie that you can watch a bunch of times because of its subject matter, but you need to watch it at least once.


MVP: Brooklynn Prince. At just 7 years old, she steals the movie.


Rotten Tomatoes: 96% Fresh


Streaming On: Nope


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9. "The Birdcage" (1996)


Release Date: March 8, 1996


Box Office (Budget): $185.3 million ($31 million)


Director: Mike Nichols


Starring: Robin Williams, Gene Hackman, Nathan Lane, Dianne Wiest, Calista Flockhart


Where We Be?: Miami


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Remake of hit French comedy about a gay couple pretending to be straight for their son’s ultra-conservative future in-laws.


Scene to Remember: Lane, dressed in drag, fools future in-laws Hackman and Wiest into thinking he’s actually a woman.


Best Line: "It’s like riding a psychotic horse toward a burning stable."


Legacy: The remake of "La Cage aux Folles" was a massive, surprise box office hit thanks to the electric comedic chemistry of Williams and Lane. This was Williams in his prime teamed up with an aging A-lister in Hackman and up-and-comer with Lane.


MVP: Nathan Lane. Lane was largely unknown to movie audiences, but this movie made him a star.


Rotten Tomatoes: 79% Fresh


Streaming On: Hulu


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8. "Body Heat" (1981)


Release Date: Aug. 28, 1981


Box Office (Budget): $24 million ($9 million)


Director: Lawrence Kasdan


Starring: William Hurt, Kathleen Turner, Richard Crenna, Ted Danson, Mickey Rourke


Where We Be?: Palm Beach County


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Throwback thriller starring once-in-a-generation bombshell.


Scene to Remember: "There’s a problem with the will."


Best Line: "When it gets this hot, people try to kill each other."


Legacy: Two-fisted debut of Kasdan as director and Turner’s first movie role. Turner would go on to be a huge star the rest of the 1980s. Kasdan, the screenwriter for some of the biggest hits in movie history, including several "Star Wars" movies and "Raiders of the Lost Ark," would make "The Big Chill" in 1983.


MVP: Kathleen Turner. Topples Hurt, Crenna, Danson and Rourke in her first acting role. Bravo.


Rotten Tomatoes: 98% Fresh


Streaming On: HBO GO


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7. "There’s Something About Mary" (1998)


Release Date: July 15, 1998


Box Office (Budget): $370 million ($23 million)


Directors: The Farrelly Brothers


Starring: Cameron Diaz, Ben Stiller, Matt Dillon, Chris Elliott, Lee Evans


Where We Be?: Miami


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Gross-out comedy/romantic comedy featuring an A-list actress in her prime.


Scene to Remember: Nothing we can print here.


Best Line: "Frank and beans! Frank and beans!"


Legacy: This is a movie that probably wouldn’t get made in 2019, for a lot of reasons. But in 1998, it took over the public consciousness and made money hand over fist all summer and ended up with Golden Globe nominations for Best Picture – Musical or Comedy and Diaz for Best Actress – Musical or Comedy.


MVP: Cameron Diaz. Career-defining role that marked back-to-back summer blockbuster hits after "My Best Friend’s Wedding" in 1997.


Rotten Tomatoes: 83% Fresh


Streaming On: Nope


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6. "Miami Vice" (2006)


Release Date: July 28, 2006


Box Office (Budget): $163.8 million ($135 million)


Director: Michael Mann


Starring: Jamie Foxx, Colin Farrell, Naomie Harris, Ciaran Hinds, Gong Li, Justin Theroux


Where We Be?: Miami


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Rebooting one of the most iconic TV shows of all-time as a big-budget movie with two of the biggest A-list stars in the game and an A-list director.


Scene to Remember: The opening scene at the nightclub with the Linkin Park/Jay-Z "Encore" mash-up playing over the action.


Best Line: "They’ll say ohhh what is that? Some kind of a ... Jackson Pollock? No. That’s what’s left of Jose Yaro."


Legacy: Foxx put the bug in Mann’s ear during an after-party for Ali, which Foxx was also in and Mann directed. Several years later, Foxx was an A-list star and this was the movie he wanted made. Ripped by critics and considered a box-office bomb upon release, it’s received new life in recent years with praise of its gloomy aesthetic and cinematography.


MVP: Go-Fast Boats. Who knew they were so undetectable? And that you could get to Cuba that fast from Miami?


Rotten Tomatoes: 46% Fresh


Streaming On: Starz


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5. "Magic Mike" (2012)


Release Date: June 29, 2012


Box Office (Budget): $167.2 million ($7 million)


Director: Steven Soderbergh


Starring: Channing Tatum, Alex Pettyfer, Cody Horn, Matt Bomer, Olivia Munn, Joe Manganiello, Matthew McConnaughey


Where We Be?: Tampa


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: High-concept movie about a male stripper trying to make a better life for himself.


Scene to Remember: Tatum dances to Ginuwine’s "Pony" after the intro from McConnaughey.


Best Line: "I think I see a lot of lawbreakers up in this house tonight!"


Legacy: Rare is the young film star who can conceive an idea for a film, recruit a writer, recruit an Academy Award-winning director and then recruit other stars to be in his movie. Tatum did it. Based partly on his experiences as a teenage male stripper in Orlando, Tatum co-financed the film, it became a blockbuster summer hit and spawned a sequel, "Magic Mike XXL" in 2015.


MVP: Channing Tatum. This will be the movie he’s remembered for.


Rotten Tomatoes: 80% Fresh


Streaming On: Nope


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4. "Some Like It Hot" (1959)


Release Date: March 29, 1959


Box Office (Budget): $40 million ($2.9 million)


Director: Billy Wilder


Starring: Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon, George Raft, Pat O’Brien, Joe E. Brown


Where We Be?: Miami


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: Genre-busting film about two musicians who go on the run, cross-dressing to escape gangsters and falling in love with the same girl.


Scene to Remember: When Lemmon’s character finally tells his paramour, Osgood, that he’s a man.


Best Line: "Well, nobody’s perfect."


Legacy: Wilder originally wanted Frank Sinatra for the role that eventually went to Curtis after Sinatra refused to audition. Widely considered one of the greatest comedies of all-time, it scored six Academy Award nominations and turned all three of its principle characters – Curtis, Lemmon and Monroe – into worldwide stars.


MVP: Jack Lemmon. His Oscar nomination for Best Actor is one thing you can point to when you make the argument for him as possibly the greatest comedic actor of all-time.


Rotten Tomatoes: 97% Fresh


Streaming On: Nope


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3. "Cool Hand Luke" (1967)


Release Date: Nov. 1, 1967


Box Office (Budget): $16.2 million ($3.2 million)


Director: Stuart Rosenberg


Starring: Paul Newman, George Kennedy, J.D. Cannon, Robert Drivas, Lou Antonio, Strother Martin


Where We Be?: Somewhere outside of Gainesville


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: The best-looking movie star in the history of the world stars in a riveting prison drama.


Scene to Remember: When Luke wins a bet by eating 50 hard-boiled eggs in one hour.


Best Line: "What we have here is a failure to communicate."


Legacy: George Kennedy won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of Dragline, Luke’s nemesis who ultimately becomes his best friend. Newman was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actor but lost to Rod Steiger ("In The Heat of the Night"). Newman was nominated for Best Actor eight times, winning just once in 1986 for "The Color of Money."


MVP: Paul Newman. The movie’s success cemented Newman’s status as an A-list star … for the next four decades.


Rotten Tomatoes: 100% Fresh


Streaming On: Nope


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2. Scarface (1983)


Release Date: Dec. 1, 1983


Box Office (Budget): $65.9 million ($37 million)


Director: Brian De Palma


Starring: Al Pacino, Michelle Pfeiffer, Steven Bauer, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio


Where We Be?: Miami


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: The rise and fall of Cuban immigrant and Miami drug kingpin Tony Montana.


Scene to Remember: Tony’s death scene, where he faces down an entire squad of South American assassins.


Best Line: "Say hello to my little friend!"


Legacy: The remake of the 1932 original was met with negative to mixed reviews upon release and considered a box-office bomb. The years have been much more kind, and it’s now considered one of the greatest gangster movies of all-time, thanks in no small part to the rise of hip-hop and its top artists’ obsession with the film.


MVP: Al Pacino. Tony Montana is neck-and-neck for his most iconic role alongside Michael Corleone in "The Godfather" trilogy.


Rotten Tomatoes: 81% Fresh


Streaming On: Starz


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1. "Moonlight" (2016)


Release Date: Oct. 21, 2016


Box Office (Budget): $65.2 million ($4 million)


Director: Barry Jenkins


Starring: Trevante Rhodes, Andre Holland, Janelle Monae, Ashton Sanders, Jharrel Jerome, Naomie Harris, Mahershala Ali, Alex Hibbert


Where We Be?: Miami


One-Sentence Elevator Pitch: An exploration of black masculinity, sexuality and conscience seen through the eyes of a young boy (Chiron) growing up in Miami that follows him through his teenage years and into adulthood.


Scene to Remember: The gut-wrenching final exchange between drug dealer Juan (Ali) and young Chiron (Hibbert).


Best Line: "At some point, you’ve got to decide for yourself who you’re gonna be."


Bottom Line: Moonlight won Academy Awards for Best Picture and Best Supporting Actor for Mahershala Ali. Oscar presenters Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty accidentally announced "La La Land" as the Best Picture winner before "La La Land" producer Jordan Horowitz, already on stage, announced "Moonlight" as the real winner in one of the more bizarre moments in Oscar history.


MVP: Mahershala Ali. His star-making turn as drug dealer Juan was the first of two Oscar wins in three years.


Rotten Tomatoes: 99% Fresh


Streaming On: Netflix


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