Considering the topic of safety on school campuses currently being a delicate concern across the state and country in the aftermath of a string of school shootings and violence, Taylor acknowledged that the CHS incident could be "to a certain extent, disturbing," and that childish acts such as this one can no longer be viewed as simple pranks or playful gestures.

CHIPLEY – What has been speculated to be a senior prank at one local high school, has turned out to be a great deal more.

A handful of students at Chipley High School ventured into vandalism and burglary when they entered a classroom before sunrise Tuesday to deliberately damage things. According to officials, the perpetrators entered the classroom through an unlocked window.

Photos taken of the disarrayed classroom show tables and chairs turned upside down and out of order, a substance smeared on the teachers seat, clothes that officials believe were donated to the Tiger Pride Closet strewn across the room, toilet paper tossed all around - and speculation of loosed crickets. No injuries were reported, officials said.

According to Principal Kyle Newsom, the incident is under investigation by Washington County Sheriff’s Office to determine guilty parties and the extent of the situation.

"The WCSO is investigating at this time to find out who is responsible and how it should be handled," Newsom said.

However, after making contact with the sheriff's office and Washington County School Board Superintendent Joseph Taylor late Thursday, The News learned that the incident is not being treated as a criminal investigation and the school district is overseeing the way forward.

Considering the topic of safety on school campuses currently being a delicate concern across the state and country in the aftermath of a string of school shootings and violence, Taylor acknowledged that the CHS incident could be "to a certain extent, disturbing," and that childish acts such as this one can no longer be viewed as simple pranks or playful gestures.

"We can't do that anymore," he said emphatically. He said the school district is handling the disciplinary response outside of the public eye. Taylor assure parents school officials acknowledge the importance of taking an appropriate direction in responding to the incident.

Parents are welcome to reach out to CHS and WCSB with questions or concerns, he said.

On Wednesday morning, school administration made an announcement to encourage students to help clean up the mess left over from the vandalistic act. More than 100 students took on the task.

Among those things that were cleaned up was the bronze tiger statue that the CHS's Class of 1967 donated to the school last year. The tiger was slathered in petroleum jelly, feathered with toilet papered and covered with a large garbage can.

Principal Newsom said he was "embarrassed" by the activities of the students who were involved in the incident.

"I am embarrassed that my students would act in such a manner," he said. "I can deal with a lot of things as a principal, but when it ventures into criminal activity, it becomes a problem. To treat a teacher, that has done so much for this school in such a manner, is unbelievable."