Floridians would not have to adjust their clocks by an hour in the spring and fall if legislation filed by state Sen. Greg Steube to abolish daylight saving time in the state becomes law.

Steube, R-Sarasota, filed a bill this month that would exempt Florida from the practice of setting clocks an hour forward in the spring and an hour back in the fall.

Florida would join Arizona and Hawaii as the only states that don’t observe daylight saving time.

Steube said he “heard from a number of people in my district that it has a negative impact, especially on school-age children.”

“Thought it would be a worthy discussion to have,” he added.

Daylight saving time was first utilized during World War I to limit fuel consumption during waking hours. Critics say it is disruptive and unnecessary, especially in a southern states such as Florida, where the difference between winter and summer daylight is less pronounced than in the north.

Legislation has been filed in the past to eliminate daylight saving time in Florida but it did not advance. Steube’s bill does not have a House companion and has not been heard in any Senate committees yet.