CHIPLEY — A chiropractor who was arrested for burning down his Chipley office in 1995 was the subject of a 20/20 investigation which aired Friday on the ABC network.


Click here to watch the 20/20 episode "Sneaking Suspicions.



 



CHIPLEY — A chiropractor who was arrested for burning down his Chipley office in 1995 was the subject of a 20/20 investigation which aired Friday on the ABC network.



Michael Allan Wohlschlaeger is being accused of killing his fifth wife, Shirley Seitz, by the woman’s relatives.



There were no charges against Wohlschlaeger in Seitz’s death, nor was he ever arrested in connection with the death.



Wohlschlaeger was, however, arrested in October 1995 by the Chipley Police Department in connection with the arson of his chiropractic office. He was convicted of arson in June 1997 and sentenced to 15 years’ probation, which ended in June 2012.



Seitz’s relatives aired their suspicions about Wohlschlaeger’s involvement in her death on the 20/20 episode “Sneaking Suspicions,” which aired nationally Friday, Sept. 6.



The Washington County News contributed file stories and photos to the 20/20 investigation.



Wohlschlaeger's fifth wife, Seitz, died in their Loxley, Ala., bedroom following days of unexplained pain. Her relatives say he is responsible, but Wohlschlaeger was never  charged with any crimes in connection to her death and maintains that he is innocent.



On the 20/20 episode, Seitz’s relatives said the four-year marriage that ended with Seitz unconscious, face down on their bedroom floor.



Her relatives told  ABC journalists that since Seitz's death in 2010, her relatives have discovered that Wohlschlaeger “soaked her dry” both before and after she died, even cashing in on a $100,000 life insurance policy and having her use her $500,000 in liquid assets that she had going into the marriage to buy their home and bankroll their life together.



Seitz's daughter Sharon Yeomans said that they were wary of Wohlschlaeger's financial footing even before her mother decided to marry him.



“He came into the marriage with the clothes on his back. And he's a doctor?” Yeomans told ABC.



Her relatives were hesitant when Seitz rushed into her marriage with Wohlschlaeger in 2006 after just a three-month courtship.



Adding to that, Seitz had her own share of relationship issues in the past, as this was also her fifth marriage, relatives said.



Her fourth husband Gene Seitz had left her $1million following his death, and while she never told her relatives that she felt used during her four-year marriage to Wohlschlaeger, the claim to have found out after her death that she had felt used, according to Seitz’s personal journals.



“How much longer am I going to have to financially support this man? He said he wasn't going to do this to me. He said he was going to get a job. He's constantly spending my money. Lord when is he going to get a job?” Seitz wrote in one entry, according to her daughter.



Two of Wohlschlaeger’s other ex-wives were also on 20/20 saying that he also showed violent behavior during their marriages — facts that they did not disclose during the investigation into Seitz's death.



His third wife, Gloria Potts, was married to him from 1981 to 1995. When contacted by Seitz's daughter, she said that he once hit her with a mallet in the back of her head and then tried to smother her in their bed.



Potts said that she was hospitalized after the incident and told doctors that she fell in the shower.




When she later asked what he was doing, Potts said that Wohlschlaeger told her his actions were the result of a jellyfish sting.



“He told me he had gotten stung by jellyfish when he was in China and that it was a reaction to the toxins,” Potts said.



Potts did not leave Wohlschlaeger until a decade later — a move that she cannot rationally explain now, but when she did finally divorce him, she told police about the mallet incident and now has a restraining order against him.



Wohlschlaeger's fourth wife, Diana Yohn, was the woman he divorced just months before marrying Seitz.



She told police that while she did not have firm proof, she felt that her regular migranes got significantly worse during her marriage to Wohlschlaeger and she felt he played a role in her pain.



“I think that the man's dangerous, personally,” she told police.



During the investigation into Seitz’s death, Wohlschlaeger reportedly told police that in the days leading up to her death, Seitz had been feeling ill and having one of her bi-annual bouts of migranes.



Seitz’s mother and brother told ABC that they made a surprise visit to the home that Seitz and Wohlschlaeger shared in Loxley to check in on her. They said that Seitz felt so ill that she could not even get out of bed to greet them.



When they arrived, Wohlschlaeger said that he had been out of town but when he got back he saw that a potted plant had been broken and he believed Seitz had possibly fallen down the stairs. She denied falling down the stairs.



Seitz’s symptoms had improved by the time she said goodnight to her relatives on Sunday Feb. 28, 2010. The next morning, they awoke to Wohlschlaeger screaming that his wife was unconscious.



Wohlschlaeger had been sleeping on the couch, and on that Monday morning he said he went into the bedroom and found his wife lying on the floor, unconscious, and her lips were already blue when he saw her.



This was not Wohlschlaeger’s first wife who died. Throughout his marriage to Seitz, he had told her and her relatives that his first wife, Lynn, died of leukemia.



Following her mother’s death, Yeoman found an old newspaper clipping that reported that Lynn Mary Wohlschlaeger died after choking on a cough drop at the age of 25.



The cause of death for Seitz was not as clear, however, as an autopsy listed the cause of death was inconclusive but that she had a series of blunt force head injuries.



“Man, I hate to say this, but I think someone murdered my sister,” Seitz’s brother Chester told 20/20.



The Alabama Attorney General has now reopened the investigation into Seitz’s death, though the former chiropractor no longer lives in the state.



Wohlschlaeger now lives in Pensacola with his sixth wife, Maggie.