CHIPLEY — The Chipley City Council held brief public hearings on Tuesday and approved the final readings of two ordinances that abandoned right-of-ways for the property where the new Dollar General store will be built.


CHIPLEY — The Chipley City Council held brief public hearings on Tuesday and approved the final readings of two ordinances that abandoned right-of-ways for the property where the new Dollar General store will be built.



The council also accepted the city planning commission’s recommendation that the development order for the store be approved.



The company is looking to build a 12,480-square-foot market on U.S. 90, and would relocate the store which is currently downtown Chipley to the new location, which will be a bigger Dollar General store and will feature more groceries and have up to 50 coolers, company officials have said.



The new Dollar General store will be a hybrid between a regular store and the Dollar General Market, such as the one in Slocomb, Ala.



Dollar General Corporation, based in Goodlettsville, Tenn. is the nation's largest small-box discount retailer, according to the website, dollargeneral.com.



Mayor Linda Cain also asked council members if they were dedicated to pursuing grants to fund expanding the city’s water lines south of Interstate 10. The council voted in a special meeting last month to seek a consulting firm to help with the process of securing grants for city water system improvements, including extending water to property south of the interstate for potential commercial development.



The city plans to advertise a Request For Qualifications, which is an advertisement seeking informational bids from qualified consulting firms. Once the bids are received, the council will pick a firm from the applicants.



“I want to be sure this council is committed to doing this before we release this RFQ and take up a lot of people’s time,” Cain said.



“I think it is a necessity,” said Councilman Kevin Russell.



The mayor also announced a committee she was forming for the design of a park which will be located where the city’s water tower now stands. Once the old tower is demolished, the committee will be charged with developing a historical site.



“I definitely want the water tower and the old ice house remembered,” Cain said. “I can’t hardly stand the thought of it being torn down.”



The council voted on March 7 to pursue taking down the old water tower after discovering that it would cost nearly $200,000 to bring the structure back up to code, and learning the roof of the tower has rusted loose and is just sitting atop the structure.



Demolition of the tower is expected to cost $24,000.



The mayor said members of the committee, which will be chaired by Councilman Kevin Russell, will include Darrin Wall, Valerie Parks, Dorothy Odom and Jim Morris.